Submit a Case Submit Case Find a Neutral Search Neutral

JAMS ADR Blog

Blog List Banner

Do We Need a New York Convention for Mediation/Conciliation?


By Lorraine M. Brennan, Esq.

The 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (New York Convention) is viewed by many as one of the most (if not the most) successful commercial treaties to which the United States has become a party.  To date, 154 countries have signed the New York Convention (most recently Bhutan, Burundi, Guyana and the State of Palestine), and the treaty is truly global in its scope.  While the United States did not accede to the New York Convention until 1970, it has since been one of the leaders in promulgating jurisprudence, which is favorable to international arbitration and played a major role in advancing its use to resolve commercial disputes worldwide.  The New York Convention consists of only 16 articles, and the goal of the Convention is two-fold:  to enforce the parties’ agreement to arbitrate on the front end and to enforce any resulting award on the back end.

With this backdrop in mind, in July 2014 the United States submitted a proposal to the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Working Group II that it develop a convention on the enforcement of conciliated settlement agreements for international commercial disputes.  In February 2015, UNCITRAL Working Group II held meetings in New York, where it considered this proposal with the goal of reporting to UNCITRAL on whether such a project was feasible.

Some of the challenges involved in this undertaking have been reported by observers at the February 2015 meetings.  To begin with, do we need such a convention?  If we do, what should it look like?  Should it model the New York Convention and allow for enforcement at both ends; i.e., enforcement of the agreement to mediate/conciliate and enforcement of the ultimate settlement (if any) reached by the parties?  Or should it focus primarily on the settlement agreement itself, bearing in mind that parties do not necessarily come to mediation via a contractual provision to meditate/conciliate.  Would such a convention give the parties more confidence in agreeing to use mediation/conciliation?  What difficulties would need to be overcome from a procedural standpoint?  For example, Article V(1) of the New York Convention provides grounds on which a court can refuse to enforce an arbitral award, including procedural grounds such as lack of notice or the arbitrators overstepping their authority.  Article V(2) also provides public policy safeguards for the parties and allows an enforcing court to refuse recognition and enforcement if these grounds are violated.  Would these same procedural safeguards need to be included in a convention on mediation/conciliation?

Some of the attendees at the February 2015 Working Group II session put forward the view that mediated/conciliated settlement agreements could be reduced to “consent awards,” thereby reducing the settlement to an arbitral award, which would be enforceable under the New York Convention.  The obvious downside of that approach is the cost and the delay—parties would have to commence an arbitration, appoint an arbitrator and have that arbitrator sign off on the settlement agreement as a consent award, not to mention that arbitrators may not want to be viewed as a “rubber stamp” for an agreement the parties entered into without the assistance of the arbitrator.

For the rest of Do We Need a New York Convention for Mediation/Conciliation, please read the full article from Law.com.


Disclaimer:

This page is for general information purposes.  JAMS makes no representations or warranties regarding its accuracy or completeness.  Interested persons should conduct their own research regarding information on this website before deciding to use JAMS, including investigation and research of JAMS neutrals. See More



AUTHOR(S)

Lorraine M. Brennan, Esq.

Categories

Archives

JAMS NEWSLETTERS

ABOUT OUR BLOG

The JAMS ADR blog serves to engage our clients, the legal community and the public in a discussion about alternative dispute resolution. As leaders in mediation, arbitration and more, we strive to remain at the forefront of legal developments, trends and news in areas of law that pertain to ADR.

Welcome to the JAMS ADR blog. We hope you find it informative, interesting and we hope you visit again soon.