Submit a Case Submit Case Find a Neutral Search Neutral

Mediation of Class Actions Since the "Financial Meltdown"

Publication Banner

Mediation of Class Actions Since the "Financial Meltdown"

Source: American Association of Justice Newsletter
Date: Fall 2009

Hon. William J. Cahill (Ret.)
    © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   PAG E 3   On August 28, 2008, the  Dow  Jones  Industrial  Average  closed at 11,715.  By November 21,  2008, it had fallen to 8,046, and  on March 9, 2009, it had sunk to a  low of 6,547 (as of this writing, it  has  risen  to  over  9,400).   This  “financial  meltdown”  or  “Great  Recession” has effected all litiga- tion, including mediations of class  actions.  “No Money to Settle” Rings True  More Often    The  most  obvious  change in all mediations that has  occurred  since  last  fall  is  that  defense statements that the defen- dant company has no money or “is  too  broke”  to  pay  a  reasonable  settlement  have  become  state- ments that plaintiff’s counsel must  treat  with  less  skepticism  than  they have in the past.  It is now  less likely that the statements are  a “bluff” made in an effort to cre- ate leverage in negotiations, but in  fact may reflect a serious reality.   For  example,  in  a  class  action  against  a  large  bank,  plaintiffs  during  a  mediation  last  fall  re- jected  a  $25,000,000  offer.   Months  later  that  bank  began  appearing in the national news for  reasons  completely  unrelated  to  the  litigation,  and  the  $25,000,000  settlement offer simply disappeared  following the “financial meltdown.”    As  in  all  mediations,  where the defense raises the possibil- ity that there is insufficient money to  pay  a  reasonable  settlement,  the  plaintiff’s  counsel,  whether  she  be- lieves the cry of poverty or not, still  needs  actual  evidence  of  that  fact  before advising the client.  A lawyer  simply cannot advise his or her cli- ents to take a small settlement based  on a  hearsay statement by  defense  counsel that is made in a confiden- tial mediation setting.  In the past,  when this issue came up, defendants  were often reluctant to make audited  financial  statements  available  or  make declarations under oath as to  their  personal  financial  situation.   There was often the statement, “I am  telling you the truth, go ahead and  take me to trial and see.”      After the “financial  melt- down”  some  defendants  have  be- come  almost  anxious  to  provide  private  financial  information  to  plaintiffs  (often  under  a  protective  order and often “for attorneys’ eyes  only”).  It appears that today more  and  more  defendants  are  facing  actual and serious financial difficul- ties and want to do what they can to  end expensive litigation earlier.  To  AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R Mediation of Class Actions Since the  “Financial Meltdown”  Hon. William Cahill (Ret.)  Author Spotlight  Judge William Cahill  (Ret.) of JAMS is a  nationally renowned  mediator who has  successfully assisted  parties in resolving  numerous complex  and highly conten- tious matters.   (continued on page 4)  VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009     © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   PAG E 4 accomplish this they are taking  the  position  of  offering  what  they  can  afford  and  justifying  that  position  by  providing  fi- nancial information where they  would not have done so before.   If that fails, they feel they have  no  choice  but  to  save  their  company  by  “rolling  the  dice”  and going to trial.  It is their  hope that they can convince the  plaintiff that a judgment will be  hard if not impossible to collect  and  therefore  they  hope  to  settle in a range they can actu- ally  afford  under  the  circum- stances.  Beginning in Late 2008 There  Were Changes in Mediation  Negotiations     Beginning in Novem- ber  2008  and  continuing  through  January  2009,  the  number  of  class  action  and  commercial mediations (at least  for many of the persons I know)  dropped by 10%-20% or more.   Since  then,  while  there  has  been  an  increase,  the  number  of mediations has not reached  “Pre-Meltdown”  days.  One of  the  explanations  given  is  that  individual companies and cor- porations  during  the  “meltdown”  were  in  “shock”  and were doing nothing except  trying  to  remain  solvent.   Al- most  no  one  had  seen  these  major financial problems com- ing.  Resolving litigation became  a low priority compared to keep- ing the company from going out  of business.  And, in my experi- ence,  when  the  mediation  did  take place, the statements that  an offer was a “bottom line” or a  “take  it  or  leave  it”  became  much  more  firm  than  in  any  other time.  For the 10 years I  was  a  judge  and  9  years  as  a  mediator,  I  never  literally  be- lieved  such  statements  and  neither  did  sophisticated  and  professional  counsel.   That  changed last fall.      Starting last fall such  statements  started  becoming  more and more true.  Defense  counsel  and  in-house  counsel  appeared  to  start  analyzing  settlement differently.  Compa- nies  in  real  financial  trouble  were  deciding  that  they  could  only  pay  a  certain  amount  of  money on the matter, regardless  of the strength of the claims.  If  the amount they could pay was  insufficient,  many  defendants  would  not  increase  their  offer.   Instead, they made the decision  simply to use that same money  to pay their defense lawyers over  time.   The  expenditure  would  then not be used for settlement,  but  would  be  gradually  stretched  over  months  and  maybe  years.   That  way  either  the  economy  would  improve  and they would be in no worse a  position vis a vis settlement, and  if the economy did not improve,  they  believed that there was a  good  chance  the  company  would  no  longer  exist.   The  merits of the case faded in com- parison to the focus on a com- pany’s short-term survival.  Insurance Coverage Disputes  Show a New Strain    Since  the  “financial  meltdown”  I  have  seen  cases  where the relationship between  an  insurance  carrier  and  its  insureds has become even more  strained  than  they  sometimes  were  before.   Mediation  often  involves  not only the  plaintiff/ AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R Mediation of Class Actions Since the “Financial Meltdown”   (continued from page 3)  VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009 “Almost  no  one  had  seen  these  major  financial  problems coming.  Resolving litigation became a  low  priority  compared  to  keeping  the  company  from going out of business.  And, in my experience,  when the mediation did take place, the statements  that an offer was a “bottom line” or a “take it or  leave it” became much more firm than in any other  time.”     © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   defendant  negotiations,  but  also the defendant/carrier cov- erage  negotiations.   Although  they take different forms, these  coverage disputes often have to  do with which claims are cov- ered  (and  thus  paid  by  insur- ance) and which claims are not  covered.   Such   defendant/ carrier  disputes  typically  con- cern  how  much  a  defendant  company  will  contribute  to  a  settlement as compared to the  carrier based on coverage argu- ments.  Such disputes are quite  common,  presenting  them- selves in numerous forms and  contexts.     After  the  “financial  meltdown,”  such  insurance  coverage disputes often became  more intense.  The carriers now  would ask and demand contri- butions to settlement and com- panies  would  simply  refuse.   The refusal  differed  from past  situations  because  the  dispute  Although this argument had not  been made much in the past, the  changed  circumstances  caused  by  the  “meltdown”  made  the  corporations  very  firm  in  their  positions.   As  a  result  it  has  become more  common for the  carriers  to  simply  pay  more  money than they would have a  year ago to resolve the matter,  or sometimes the litigation that  could  have  settled  a  year  ago  simply  does  not  resolve.   Of  course, if a plaintiff or his or her  counsel becomes convinced that  a defendant is indeed in a finan- cial  emergency,  they  agree  to  settle,  often  below  what  they  believed  to  be  an  appropriate  “pre-meltdown” value.  The Usual Class Action Settle- ment Issues Arise, but With  More Intensity    Of  course  the  merits  of a normal class action lawsuit  continue just as they did “pre- meltdown,” but for the reasons  stated  above,  the  issues  some- times  are  negotiated  more  in- tensely than before.  The class  definition, the size of the class,  the source of  funds to pay for  publication  and  notice,  the  amount  of  the  settlement  and  possible  reversion  and  cy  pres  continue  to  be  the  subject  of  intense  negotiation.  It  may  be  the  case  now  that  defendants  are willing to settle on behalf of  a smaller class than they would  have otherwise, thus taking the  AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R PAG E 5 would  take  a  form  that  was  unrelated to the coverage posi- tions or litigation.  Companies,  even those with a lot of cash on  hand or a fairly consistent reve- nue  stream,  became  more  and  more reluctant to contribute to  a settlement,  not because they  were being advised by coverage  counsel  that  the  carrier’s  posi- tion was unreasonable, but be- cause corporate officers honestly  believed that to pay a substan- tial settlement out of their liquid  corporate  funds  now  created  problems that were worse than  continued litigation with plain- tiff  or  the  carrier.   Often  the  defendant  had  made  recent  layoffs and there was a real pos- sibility  that  there  would  be  a  need  to  further  reduce  their  workforce.  In some cases reve- nues  were  down  substantially  even from a few months before  and  there  were  concerns  that  cash would be needed to cover  expenses,  not  resolving  cases.   “ Companies, even those with a lot of cash on hand  or a fairly consistent revenue stream, became more  and more reluctant to contribute to a settlement,  not  because  they  were  being  advised  by  coverage  counsel  that  the  carrier’s  position  was  unreasonable,  but  because  corporate  officers  honestly  believed  that  to  pay  a  substantial  settlement out of their liquid corporate funds now  created problems that were worse than continued  litigation with plaintiff or the carrier.”  (continued on page 6)  VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009     © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   PAG E 6 chance that they do not get res  judicata for the largest possible  number of class members.  This  has been explained as simply a  cost control measure.   In these  economic  times,  Defendants  are balancing the risk of a fu- ture  lawsuit  for  another  class  with the cost of paying a larger  settlement.      Always the subject of  intense negotiations, the reso- lution of the issue of the defen- dant  paying  class  counsel’s  attorneys’ fees also has, if possi- ble, become even more intense,  but  there  have  also  been  changes.  If the fees cannot be  resolved at the mediation, de- fendants, who would refuse in  the past, are more likely to take  the fee dispute to binding arbi- tration  or  baseball  arbitration.   It  used  to  be  that  defendants  rarely agreed to have the court  or  arbitrator  decide  the  fees  (defendants needed to know the  entire cost of a settlement), but  that also is becoming more com- mon  with  defendants  choosing  to litigate fee issues.      There also appears to  be more of an effort by defen- dants  to  resolve  class  actions  very early.  If this trend proves  successful it will benefit every- one:  the Court, the  class, the  defendant, and counsel.  For an  early  settlement  approach  to  succeed, however, the defendant  has to be willing to provide all  reasonable  discovery  promptly  so that the plaintiffs can prop- erly  evaluate  their  case;  the  plaintiff  has  to  do  the  same.   Once  that  procedure  is  com- plete  the  class  action  can  be  settled if everyone believes that  the facts are being represented  by  the  other  side  truthfully.   Early  settlement  negotiations  fail  most often when one side sim- ply  does  not  trust  what  it  is  being told.  Parties who under- stand this can accomplish early  settlement.   Since  the  “meltdown”  there  are  more  parties  who  are  taking  these  steps  and  getting  early  settle- ments.    Counsel on both sides  of the litigation have begun to  live with these new realities of  mediation.   Defense  counsel  obviously  realized  it  sooner.   The  cost  of  litigation  has  had  clients even more conscious of  containing costs.  Fewer lawyers  appear to be coming to media- tions  in  an  apparent  effort  to  reduce fees, and we are told by  defense  counsel  that  there  is  new  pressure  on  counsel  to  reduce their fees.  It also appears  that  corporate  counsel  have  become more and more active in  the  actual  mediation  negotia- tions.  In some early mediations,  outside counsel does not attend  at all.    For quite a while the  plaintiffs’ bar did not appear to  recognize  how  the  “financial  meltdown”  affected  their  prac- tice.  I mentioned earlier about  the $25,000,000 offer that disap- peared  when  the  defendant  company ran into serious finan- cial problems.  On the plaintiffs’  AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R Mediation of Class Actions Since the “Financial Meltdown”   (continued from page 5)  VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009 “I have been told that in-house counsel in these  economic times have a difficult time convincing  management  that  there  are  good  reasons  to  spend  corporate  money  on  settlements,  and  a  Mediator’s Proposal gives them an extra level of  credibility.  The same is true for public entities,  and perhaps even more so.  Whatever its genesis,  the phenomenon is recent and it would not be too  far from the truth to say that more than 50% of  my mediations include some type of Mediator’s  Proposal.”      © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   PAG E 7 side,  while  it  was  always  the  case  when  examining  defen- dants’  financial  statements,  there is now even more insis- tence on seeing actual proof of  a poor financial situation, with  some  lawyers  hiring  forensic  accountants to verify the finan- cial  situation  of  defendants.   And, not surprisingly, plaintiffs  are sometimes settling cases for  less than they have been in the  past.   In  fact,  within  the  last  week  a  class  action  plaintiff’s  counsel  actually  accepted  a  “take it or leave it and do not  give me a counter” defense offer,  forgoing the option of walking  out in the hopes of increasing  the value of the settlement later  in the litigation.  That just did  not happen a year ago.      The “meltdown” also  may have lead to an increased  desire  for  “Mediator’s  Propos- als”  and  it  may  be  that  those  Proposals  are  more  and  more  often  accepted  (I  continue  to  find that when counsel ask for a  Mediator’s  Proposal  it  is  too  early to give one that is effec- tive).  I have been told that in- house  counsel  in  these  eco- nomic  times  have  a  difficult  time  convincing  management  that there are good reasons to  spend  corporate  money  on  settlements,  and  a  Mediator’s  Proposal  gives  them  an  extra  level of credibility.  The same is  true  for  public  entities,  and  perhaps even more so.  What- ever  its  genesis,  the  phenome- non is recent and it would not  be too far from the truth to say  that more than 50% of my me- diations  include  some  type  of  Mediator’s Proposal.     Mediators  have  not  only been affected by the  cur- rent  economic  climate;  they  have  been  affected  by  the  fact  that  mediation  as  a  whole  is  becoming  more  and  more  so- phisticated  and  pro-active.   Parties’  heightened  cost- consciousness has made it more  important  for  mediators  to  quickly get to the issues.  Every  effort  must  be  made  to  have  cases resolved in one day.  This  need for results has led me to  more  frequently  require  pre- mediation  telephone  calls  that  might even include clients and  carriers.   Follow-up,  especially  right after the mediation session,  has  become  even  more  impor- tant.   Preparation  has  always  been  essential,  but  it  is  even  more so now.  It costs a lot to  prepare a case so that it is ready  for mediation (tens of thousands  of dollars often), and while us- ing every tool available to be an  effective  mediator  has  always  been the rule, it is more so now  given the economic realities that  everyone  is  living  under  since  the “financial meltdown.”    Finally, I want to note  one other noteworthy new thing  that is happening in mediation,  AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R PRACTICE POINTER  Whatever  class  definition  you  proposed  for  certification, a defendant will usually be able to  come up with some scenario—real or theoreti- cal—in which uninjured class members would  be included.  The next time a defendant argues  that  class  certification  is  inappropriate  be- cause it would impermissibly bestow judicial  standing on those who have suffered no injury,  look to a recent trend in class action case law,  which recognizes that requiring a class repre- sentative to demonstrate individual injury for  each and every class member would defeat the  purpose of class-wide representation.  See, e.g.,  Rodriguez  v.  Hayes, ---  F.3d ----,  2009  WL  2526622, *13  (9th Cir. Aug. 20, 2009) (“The fact  that some class members may have suffered no  injury or different injuries from the challenged  practice does not prevent the class from meet- ing the requirements of Rule 23(b)(2).”); Kohen  v. Pacific Inv. Management Co. LLC , 571 F.3d  672, 677 (7th Cir. July 7, 2009) (“[A] class will  often include persons who have not been in- jured by the defendant's conduct; indeed this is  almost inevitable because at the outset of the  case many of the members of the class may be  unknown, or if they are known still the facts  bearing on their claims may be unknown. Such  a  possibility  or  indeed  inevitability  does  not  preclude class certification…”); In re Tobacco II  Cases,  46  Cal.4th  298,  318-319,  (2009)  (concluding that only the class representative  must demonstrate standing to sue under Cali- fornia’s Unfair Competition Law; “the question  of standing in class actions involves the stand- ing of the class representative and not the class  members”).     VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009 (continued on page 8)     © (2009) American Association for Justice's Class Action Litigation Group  Originally published, Class Action Litigation Newsletter, Vol. 1, issue 2.  Copyright American Association for Justice,  formerly Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA®). Reprinted with permission (September 2009).   PAG E 8 even  though  it  probably  does  not  relate  to  the  “financial  meltdown.”  There have always  been great trial lawyers — rarer  in  corporate  litigation  than  before, but still with us.  Simi- larly, many litigators are great  law  and  motion  or  discovery  lawyers.  What is new, however,  is the emergence of more and  more  very  good  “mediation  lawyers.”   These  lawyers  start  with  demands  or  offers  that  show that their client is serious  about settlement.  They do not  start with a demand that is so  high  and  unreasonable  that  it  causes an equally low and un- reasonable offer.   If the other  side  is  being  unreasonable,  these lawyers ignore the other  side’s position and remain rea- sonable.   They  are  well- prepared  and  they  have  care- fully  prepared  their  client  for  the  mediation  process.   They  even  manipulate  the  mediator  to  their  advantage.   In  one  instance, looking back on it, I  am sure that one lawyer started  working  on  manipulating  my  Mediator’s  Proposal  hours  be- fore I made it.  And throughout  the day she never took a posi- tion she could not justify and  she  did  not  change  her  mind  when she outlined how she got  to where she was (but she was  open to better arguments).  As  more and more lawyers learn to  be expert mediation lawyers the  process  will  work  better  for  everyone (and maybe even con- clude successfully before 4  pm  everyday).   AAJ CLA S S ACTIO N L I TIGATION NEWS L E TTE R Mediation of Class Actions Since the “Financial Meltdown”   (continued from page 7)  VOL U M E 1, I S SU E 2 F A LL 2009   PRACTICE POINTER    With CAFA steering more and more class actions into  the federal system, district court judges are increasingly  looking for ways to isolate those cases most deserving of  the substantial time and effort that class litigation en- tails.  The class certification stage has long served such a  filtering process, and now courts are frequently engaging  a  similar  “rigorous  analysis”  at  the  pleading  stage  as  well.   The impact of Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550  U.S. 544 (2007), and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S. Ct. 1937  (May 18, 2009), has been felt most in complex litigation,  where courts have the greatest incentive to exercise their  discretion to dismiss cases that, based on the courts’ own  “experience and common sense,” strike them as implausi- ble.  Similarly, district courts are frequently relying on  FRCP 9(b) to separate class cases with detailed factual  allegations, and thus a greater likelihood of reaping sub- stantial benefits for the proposed class, from those that  are more speculative in nature.  Even when the underly- ing substantive law would not require detailed factual  allegations, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently  safeguarded the district courts’ rights to insist on par- ticularized pleading as a procedural matter.  See Kearns  v.  Ford  Motor  Co.,  567  F.3d  1120  (9th  Cir.  June  8,  2009).  Some lessons from these shifts in the law:  Treat  your  class  pleadings  as  an  appeal  for  a  scarce  re- source.  Work to convince the judge that your case, out  of the many class actions that have and will be filed be- fore him or her, is likely to benefit a large group of people  and is thus worthy of serious judicial resources.  In other  words, remember that when Congress enacted CAFA, it  didn’t  simultaneously  increase  the  size  of  or  the  re- sources available to the federal court system, which all of  a sudden found itself adjudicating many complex matters  that had long been the province of the state court sys- tem.  That reality may have an impact on your case.